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BugsGear Ukuleles


BugsGear are a Japanese ukulele company set up in 2004. They are most famous for their electric EleUkes. These are solid bodied, battery powerd ukuleles and they have a very distinctive look. BugsGear do also make a range of acoustic ukuleles, but you don't see them for sale very often (outside of Japan at least).

I have an EleUke myself (you can read my review of it on the EleUke page). It's a solid, well made ukulele. I've never had any problems with mine. From my experience, I can definitely recommend BugsGear.


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BugsGear Adventure Travel Ukulele

BugsGear Adventure Travel Ukulele

Price: $30.00
Buy It Now: $50.00

BugsGear Eleuke ekg-bl Review



This ukulele, for starters, looks great. usually, this means it's not gunna sound great but it does.

The eleuke has a pre amp with a BugsGear original designed circuit with 9V battery. Of which probibly contributes to the great sound. The one bad point about it is that the pre amp doesn't actually help if you put headphones in because it's no loader.

Here's a demo of it with a Vox DA5.



The uke's main issue, you probably wouldn't be sush a big issue, is that the strap holder thingy is placed, very annoyingly, on the back of the uke. As you should know this means that the uke will tilt if you arn't holding it, which would be very annoying at a gig.

The knobs just do volume and tone (Duh...).And that's about all i have to say about this wonderfuly ultimate ukulele.

Review by Bob of Uke Rock.

BugsGear Eleuke Review


This electric uke from Bug's Gear supposedly sounds like an electric nylon guitar, which makes a lot of sense as that is basically what it is. Powered by a 9v battery (supplied), the bridge peizo pickup outputs to a standard strap pin/jack controlled by tone and volume knobs. With its unique body shape and clear gloss coat (also available in semi-opaque blue), this uke certainly stands out in the crowd.


The body is just over an inch thick, which requires some getting used to if you're coming off an acoustic. A strap is certainly very helpful if you play standing, but hardly necessary. My model is a concert and with a fretboard about a foot long, the action varies from about 1mm at the first fret down to approximately 3 or 4mm at the twentieth.

(Note: Some Bug's Gears have headphone jacks. Mine doesn't. Their website is pretty awful too, so it's an uphill battle trying to work out versions and model numbers. Ask your eBay dealer if you're unsure.)

Like (I assume) many other people with electrics, I purchased this so I wouldn't drive people mad with my incessant noodling. While I'm not confident enough to quote exact figures, I'd estimate that it has about 20-40% the volume of my other ukes. It's certainly loud enough for you to hear when others are watching TV, but quiet enough that it won't disturb them. If you really want people in the room to hear what you've been working on, however, this beastie does seem to hold up well to a rigorous thrashing.

One small problem I have noticed is that the strings are thicker than the grooves in the nut. This causes trouble when tuning, as the strings will stick and then slip a lot which can result in tuning too high. Fortunately, my eleuke has required very little tuning after the initial setup so it's a relatively minor concern, as well as an easy fix with a small file.

As an in-home practise/mucking around uke, I'd give this 9 out of 10 – it’s practically perfect except for the nut. As a performance uke however, I can't really rate it, as I've never used the electrics and don't know how they stack up to the competition.

Pros:

Quiet enough not to annoy, loud enough to hear clearly
Stylish as all hell with its glossy topcoat and shiny frets
You can keep it under your bed instead of a baseball bat - this baby is solid wood.
Holds tuning for a very long time.
Comes in a branded padded bag with a decent sized pocket on it.

Cons:

Thin body means it can be awkward to get used to
Strap button is on the back of the heel, perpendicular to the strings (a non-issue if you play on your couch like me).
String gaps in the nut may need attention

Review by Sam
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