Beirut – Hallelujah


Beirut – Hallelujah (Chords)

Zach Condon quite often finishes off Beirut gigs with a cover of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah. Although his version is closer to Jeff Buckley’s (one of the best cover versions ever recorded).

The chords are fairly simple. One thing he does a few times in the song (and loads of times in his own songs) is play the F chord with the G string open, then hammer on at the second fret. He does a similar thing with the G chord. This time the A string is left open then hammered on.

I’ve included two versions of Am in the song (one with the A string open and one with it at the third fret). He always uses the third fret version on the C – Am change that you hear at the beginning. He throws in the easier version on a few occasions towards the end.

Kudos to Leonard Cohen for making my job easier by describing the chords in the lyrics. Why can’t all songwriters be so helpful?

Suggested Strumming

Any simple 3/4 pattern will see you through. A good one to start out with is:

d – d u d –

More Beirut Tab and Chords

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68 Comments

  1. Ben June 30th, 2011 10:35 am

    Woodshed, I just wanted to thank you so much for this tab! Its Beautiful!

  2. Josh July 2nd, 2011 1:16 am

    Is this too cliche to play at an open mic (specifically, the Great Midwest Uke Festival in Chicago)?

  3. Jon August 8th, 2011 1:56 am

    I actually think that this sounds a lot like rufus wainwright’s cover.

  4. Leeeeeewis October 2nd, 2011 12:56 pm

    i have found that the original Leonard Cohen versions or the Eels cover and thank you for putting the strum pattern up woodshed

  5. Leeeeeewis October 2nd, 2011 1:23 pm

    i found Leonard’s the easiest to sing with myself because we are both baritones and so i found it easier to meld my voice with

  6. Eleanor Dickinson October 29th, 2011 6:36 am

    I can’t seem to get the strumming on this =/ any suggestions??

  7. Josh October 29th, 2011 4:02 pm

    Eleanor, have you watched the posted video? That’s the best strumming pattern- d, dudud, dudud, etc.

  8. fxceltic January 9th, 2012 2:44 pm

    on a more general note, have just started playing the uke and working through various songs, Im guessing that where the chord appears above a certain lyric thats when you change chords.
    However, what if the chord appears mid way through the next line of lyrics, should you continue playing the chord from the previous line?

  9. Josh January 9th, 2012 6:37 pm

    Fxceltic: It depends on how the tab is written. Generally, they’re written somewhat poorly, so it’s good to have some idea of where the chord changes are in the song, as the chords may be out of sync with the lyrics. They’re usually on the beat somewhere, and definitely flow with the song. In other cases, the tab is written well and the author has done his/her best to put the chord over the correct syllable. It really depends. Make sure to listen to the song to get a feel for the chord changes.

  10. CURLYHAMMED July 13th, 2012 3:03 pm

    This guy’s enthusiasm for the song is only exceeded by his regretful lack of talent.

  11. Uke_Newbie September 9th, 2012 10:46 pm

    What is the strum pattern for this version…?

  12. Eryn January 16th, 2013 6:55 pm

    This is awesome and I’m loving playing it. Where does Condon use the hammer? I’m not hearing it.

  13. Woodshed January 16th, 2013 10:14 pm

    Eryn: He’s doing it all over the place. Like on the Am in the intro.

  14. Jack January 24th, 2013 5:29 pm

    This website is ridiculously good!

  15. Woodshed January 25th, 2013 7:07 am

    Jack: Thanks very much!

  16. kian March 3rd, 2013 1:16 am

    I truly loved this song and playing it, thanks so much for put all the work you put in to post these

  17. Woodshed March 3rd, 2013 1:45 pm

    kian: Thanks very much!

  18. ubuntu December 20th, 2014 3:37 am

    I like this version…but damien rice do a relly nice one!!! Good artist

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